Wild Hum
Gig Seeker Pro

Wild Hum

Irvine, California, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2018 | INDIE

Irvine, California, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2018
Band Folk Alternative

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Jun
21
Wild Hum @ The Study

Los Angeles, California, United States

Los Angeles, California, United States

May
02
Wild Hum @ The Burren

Somerville, Massachusetts, United States

Somerville, Massachusetts, United States

Apr
28
Wild Hum @ News Cafe

Pawtucket, Rhode Island, United States

Pawtucket, Rhode Island, United States

Apr
27
Wild Hum @ House

Brooklyn, New York, United States

Brooklyn, New York, United States

Apr
23
Wild Hum @ Rogue Bar

Scottsdale, Arizona, United States

Scottsdale, Arizona, United States

Mar
21
Wild Hum @ The Blue Beet

Newport Beach, California, United States

Newport Beach, California, United States

Jan
01
Wild Hum @ House

Somerville, Massachusetts, United States

Somerville, Massachusetts, United States

Dec
21
Wild Hum @ The Democracy Center

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Dec
15
Wild Hum @ The Studio at 550

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Dec
10
Wild Hum @ The Cantab Lounge

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Dec
05
Wild Hum @ House

Allston, Massachusetts, United States

Allston, Massachusetts, United States

Nov
09
Wild Hum @ The Green Room

Somerville, Massachusetts, United States

Somerville, Massachusetts, United States

Oct
11
Wild Hum @ Lilypad

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Music

Press


"Artist Gig Review – Wild Hum 4/23/19 at Rogue Bar"

Major kudos to all of the bands who take the big leap of faith taking their music from the bedroom to the road. These reviews are meant to be primarily about local artists from Phoenix, AZ, but I made an exception for an exceptional artist who came to visit…

It was a warm Phoenix evening and I was in white short short overalls, getting ready to take the stage for one of the final shows ever played at The Rogue Bar. I knew nothing about the other bands playing that night besides having listened to whatever music they currently had out on Spotify and YouTube. Quite honestly, I expected it to be a relatively docile evening with some chill music, a few cold beers, and some blaring music ranging from indie dream pop to garage rock, and with a variety like that, there is little room left for any other sorts of surprises.

Then I done got SHOOK.

Hannah Rooth of the Cambridge, MA- based band Wild Hum took the stage with nothing more than a ukulele and her very self, and as if stripped-down acoustic music wasn’t vulnerable enough, every word she sang came out with pieces of experiences and truths that were heart-wrenching and revealing of the type of deep-feeling person she is.

There is no question or doubt that her performance was incredibly touching, but what was most remarkable was the effortlessness with which she captivated the crowd. She was not acting out the emotions of the song, she was reliving moments of her life. She did not have melodramatic pauses, she was poignantly silent where each memory led her to be silent. In those moments of silence, we all lived with her. If so much as a breath could be heard among the crowd in those moments of stillness, it was undoubtedly a stifled sob. It was uncomfortable to have her stop singing or playing for what felt like 5-second intervals and meet me eye-to-eye. It made me choke up to hear her talk about issues prevalent in the world today, but her sincerity and the truth behind her words could not be denied.

For 12 years, the Rogue Bar was well known to Phoenix musicians as one of the first places to gig at, one of the first places to get your feet wet as a performing musician, to let your artistry show, and to display your true self onstage. Hannah brought every bit of that and more on the night of April 23rd, 2019, and served the memory and mission of the Rogue Bar well by offering nothing short of genuine artistry at its finest.

She brought it all and left it all on the stage. Hannah has a voice that is reminiscent of Lady Gaga, the presence of a fearless and charismatic visionary, and authenticity of a history book. She has been through much and isn’t afraid to share it, and she wants you to join her as she breaks down the walls of insecurity and any sort of abandonment you might feel. Maybe we, the black sheep of the world, don’t belong anywhere, but we can all be mutually displaced together wherever Wild Hum leads the way. - As For Me Band Reviews


"Divorce in the Water by Wild Hum (Hannah Rooth)"

Hannah Rooth has such an eclectic voice. Strange and emotive, her lyrics are poignant, while her vocal delivery is unique and what truly sets her apart. Hannah’s especial style is reminiscent of other powerful female performers, Tori Amos, and Quebec singer/cellist Jorane. However, Hannah also brings an innocence to her performance that albeit is in opposition to some notable pop contemporaries; I do see some similarities with Regina Spektor and St. Vincent (Annie Erin Clark).

Hannah and her newly formed band Wild Hum, are promising to release a full length album this spring. I look forward to tighter production on the full length and more of a full band sound from the trio that includes cellist April Faith-Slaker and guitarist, Adrian Avalos. In the mean time, Hannah has been busy composing and venturing out at various locales in the U.S. You can see her upcoming tour schedule on her website here. - Independent Music Reviews


"Wild Hum Set The Burren a'Burnin"

How much did Wild Hum captivate me tonight during their live feed? So much so they made me delay going to eat dinner by a solid 30 minuets. As a man who lets nothing stand between he and his food this is about the highest honor this humble writer of opinions can bestow. While I was unable to catch the full show I did manage to catch the last 30 minuets or so of the original live feed and as I mentioned earlier I was absolutely enthralled by their performance. This past Tuesday on the show I had played their only released song at the moment Divorce in the Water and both my listeners and I were enamored by their work. However I have been a fan of bands before who sounded great on their recording but got absolutely let down by their live performances. However with Wild Hum this was not the case. While lead singer Hannah Rooth may seem small in stature she has a powerful and soulful voice that filled up that entire room! She was able to convey true soulful longing emotion within the bars and spaces we call music. But don't call her a one trick pony though as she also was able to give some heartfelt primal screams that would have both made Dave Grohl and Al Green jealous during some of her covers. Having been a Trumpet player in college and many years beyond that I am no stranger to the music scene. As my band director used to tell me the hardest songs to play are always the slow ones. The notes are more exposed and open people have time to really see the true heart of the song and how much tone and emotion each player contributes to the song will be reflected to the audience. I think Wild Hum reflected this well. The cello player provided nice dark legato technique that balanced out the bright tone of Rooths Ukulele. As my band director also once said music is more than just playing the notes its filling up the spaces in between and the soft rhythm of the guitar and occasional drums rounded out the beautiful tapestry that is the music of Wild Hum. Having only heard Divorce in the Water I was excited to hear more of the upcoming album and I got my chance with their song Tenderly which now has me even more anxious for the upcoming album release which I hope we can add to our show! However it was more than just their style that kept me forgoing my dinner despite my stomachs angry protests. Hannah Rooth had a charisma of a seasoned music veteran. I would compare to the great Graham Nash of CSNY who I saw live a few years ago. She provided not only great whit and humor to the audience but also slid some serious messages in between like the importance of supporting your local artist or how we all just need to come together and love one another. She also called up a volunteer on stage to tell a joke to the audience which in all my concert viewing experiences was a first for me. Overall their music was wonderful with impeccable showmanship and can't wait for them to head to Texas where I will be willing to pay a decent price to see them. I can't wait for the new album and wish them all the best of luck on their tour. - The Prowl Media


"Wild Hum's Transformative Live Experience"

Having seen Wild Hum perform live it is utterly clear that there is something of substance in their lyrics, their connection, and their sound. With Adrian Avalos on guitar and percussion, April Faith-Slaker on cello, and Hannah Rooth on lead vocals, this trio feels truly grounded in their appreciation for music, their desire to use songs as a way to tell a story, and their ability to connect with their audience on a deeply personal level.


The first time I saw Wild Hum perform live I was truly transported. In the living room of a cozy house, Wild Hum performed ‘Divorce in the Water,’ ‘Burn Out,’ ‘Quietness,’ as well as other all-original songs. Words cannot do Hannah justice, as she sings with raw emotion and vulnerability, with pain and love through the human experience as the driving force behind each note. Her ability to control her voice and sound while telling such intimate stories through her music is a wonder in and of itself.


‘Divorce in the Water’ unpacks a very difficult situation that Hannah had to navigate, one that most people would shy away from writing about, let alone performing. This is what makes Hannah a true artist. She turns her pain, her experiences, her deepest thoughts, doubts, and feelings and turns it into living, breathing music. This sound is an entity all it’s own, capable of bringing people together, and evoking another time and place. What pulls it into vivid waking life is April’s chilling cello and Adrian’s grounding guitar.


We can all relate to relationship troubles, whether break ups, divorces, or love that never quite came to be, this song touches on a feeling that is universal- mourning a relationship that was once dear and monumental. This song encapsulates that feeling of pure vulnerability that only occurs during this time of immense loss and heartbreak. Like an insect in amber, it is timeless, chilling and transporting. I feel brought back to my first true heartbreak, what it felt like to lose that person that became your other half, your best friend. But as Hannah says so poetically “I would never make you stay.” Isn’t that true love, after all? Letting your love leave when you know the love you had has no longer become enough to keep the relationship afloat. That ebb and flow, as waves in the sea, the love coming and going is captured beautifully, and I feel like a boat lost at sea with chills going down my spine as the wind picks up and what once was is lost forever. All that is brought to life through this one song, and you can feel that pull, that each member in the audience has to their own experiences of love and loss. Each transported to a different time in their life, yet so present in the moment as Hannah belts out each powerful word.


‘Burn Out’ is another chilling song about losing someone, witnessing the fire you once had going out, and watching them leave. This song, like all the rest is so vulnerable and honest, “I wouldn’t want someone who leaves like you.” It is such a simple statement and yet so powerful in its truth. I promise you’ll get chills listening to Hannah sing her heart out. Wild Hum is full of magic, honesty, and vulnerability and is an expression of raw human experience.

Personified by Hannah Rooth, April Faith Slaker, and Adrian Avalos, this band is something to watch out for as they continue their journey. They’ll remind you that you’re not alone in your hardships, and that the world is vast and full of depth, and beautiful souls, and that you yourself, are one of them. - Danielle O'Sullivan


"Hannah Rooth & Wild Hum Release New Single "Divorce in the Water""

Hannah Rooth is a singer-songwriter hailing from the Pacific Northwest and Metropolitan South and blossoming in Cambridge, MA with band Wild Hum. A lilting, earthen vessel, Hannah Rooth molds a childhood of emotional suffocation into tales of personal softening and deepest heart-courage. Hannah's music yields blooms of steadfast wit, joyful contagion and earnest pain, with deep roots in the soil of a silk-rock soul. Come one and all, who aren't afraid to see thorns and thistles alongside the beauty of being decisively alive. Hannah Rooth releases “Divorce In The Water,” a nomadic, sweet sensual single conveyed with many emotions and with passion. The song starts off with Hannah’s soft spoken vocals that immediately shake you with their purity. The sound is so beautiful and cinematic it almost gives the song this grainy effect. You notice many different instruments in the background of the song including the cello supporting the song in its orchestrated sentiment. The metaphorical lyricism is delivered with so much emotional agony you almost feel as a unit with the artist. For those who enjoy #Lorde, #MarinaandtheDiamonds and #MelanieMartinez, you will like Hannah Rooth and her single “Divorce In The Water.”

Look inside Hannah Rooth's life with our Exclusive #BuzzMusic Interview. How did it all get started for Hannah? Find out here!

How was growing up like for you Hannah? How did you get into music?
When I was a child, I repressed much of my emotional self- and I actually have few memories of my childhood. I started writing songs when I was six or seven years old, lying in my bed at night, and I would share some of them with my baby sister, Angie, who I shared a room with. I had a babysitter who was a pianist, and when I was about eight, I told him that I write songs and he offered to compose music to them. I shared a song with him ~ called "Daddy Come Home," I still remember it ~ and after I was done singing it, he became very (understandably) concerned and asked if I was okay. I remember internalizing that experience as confirmation that I shouldn't share my inner world because it upsets people. But I've been writing music ever since, as my core means of self-expression. In the last year I've done a lot of inner work to be more emotionally available and real, and in that process I've become ready to start sharing my work more seriously.

What’s been the most significant moment of your music career thus far?
I've only performed two full shows of original music so far, performed with my amazing band Wild Hum. Adrian Avalos, the guitarist, and April Faith-Slaker, the cellist, have helped me complete a set of eight songs that express a broad range of my emotional experiences this year around divorce, family of origin trauma, and the intention to renew my orientation to love. Both of the shows have been incredibly significant. So many friends that I've made in my ten months in Cambridge, MA have shown up to witness and support me, and I've gotten so much feedback that I help people access their deep emotions, that the music is therapeutic, and that my shows feel "human," "homey," and "full of light." This is incredibly affirming and inspiring for me, because this is what I want to do in the world: embolden people to embrace their full selves, feel affirmed in and connected to their humanity, and ultimately be more empowered, hopeful, and able to make change in the world.

How was the song-writing process for “Divorce In The Water”?
With Divorce in the Water, I wanted to write something that was deeply personal - as all my music is - and also open enough to be relatable for a broad audience. I achieved this lyrically by tying concrete personal experiences together with more poetic images that depict the underlying emotions. For the melody, I varied the sections of the song in a way that mirrors my conflicting feelings about my severed relationship. April FS added a lot to the song with a beautiful cello composition during the instrumental section.

If you can lyrically interpret this single in a short sentence or two for our readers how would you interpret it from your artist perspective?
Loving someone can be very complicated and confusing, but if it's real, the core of it is a desire for both partners to be well. Sometimes that involves letting go of what you hoped for in the relationship.

What’s your favorite quality about the music you release?
My favorite quality about my music is the raw, pure expressiveness that I bring to it. I'm new to recording professionally and trying to learn how to let that come across in the studio, but what I'm really about is the element of performance where my listeners and I are just bare and together in the moment. That's impossible to totally replicate in a recording. - Buzz Music


Discography

Wild Hum

  • Type: Album
  • Released: Sept 27, 2019
  • Label: FBP Music Group
  • Writer: (Sharon) Hannah Rooth
  • Producer: Plaid Dog Recording, Mike Davidson

Photos

Bio

Singer-songwriter Hannah Rooth set out in August of 2018 to record a debut album and share her unique Americana-Soul sound with the world.  She teamed up with musical misfits April Faith-Slaker (cellist) and Adrian Avalos (guitarist) to form the band Wild Hum, and they simultaneously embarked on an intimate, powerful Cambridge (MA) tour of the music and an expansive campaign to crowdfund an album. With the support of nearly two hundred listeners and Producer Mike Davidson of Plaid Dog Studio, Hannah and Wild Hum release their debut album in Summer of 2019. On the heels of this successful launch, Hannah has relocated to SoCal and is currently working with top-tier producers, including Grammy Nominee Christian Davis.

Wild Hum's sound ranges from wispy and entrancing, bluesy-country moments to explosions of soulful, raspy thunder. Their performances are powerful, moving, and memorable.

Band Members