Wood & Wire
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Wood & Wire

Austin, Texas, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014

Austin, Texas, United States
Established on Jan, 2014
Band Folk Acoustic

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This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

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"Revalations: MCR 10.16.13"

Bluegrass band Wood & Wire comes to us as a direct result of the big World of Bluegrass convention a week or two ago in Raleigh, NC. Our booking secret agents saw this Austin, TX quartet playing and simply had to get to know them. We discovered a band that’s about three years old and that’s already landed great opportunities like touring with Yonder Mountain String Band and playing all the top clubs in the world’s capital of live music. With a new album and a smart, up-to-date take on the bluegrass tradition, we feel like we’re getting in on the ground floor of a big deal here with Wood & Wire playing our stage this week.
- Music City Roots


"Wood & Wire at KUT 2013"

Austin bluegrass band Wood & Wire takes its name directly from the music that plays. Acoustic music played on instruments made from wood and wire. The group came together in 2010, and their live shows and early recordings have already earned them a good deal of buzz around town. So it comes as no surprise that their self-titled debut album (which came out just yesterday) has already got some great reviews. Wood & Wire’s Texas bluegrass sound is not to be missed.

Wood & Wire will play a CD release show at the Cactus Cafe on Friday. Listen to their live set in Studio 1A right HERE!
- KUT.com


"Wood & Wire at KUT 2013"

Austin bluegrass band Wood & Wire takes its name directly from the music that plays. Acoustic music played on instruments made from wood and wire. The group came together in 2010, and their live shows and early recordings have already earned them a good deal of buzz around town. So it comes as no surprise that their self-titled debut album (which came out just yesterday) has already got some great reviews. Wood & Wire’s Texas bluegrass sound is not to be missed.

Wood & Wire will play a CD release show at the Cactus Cafe on Friday. Listen to their live set in Studio 1A right HERE!
- KUT.com


"Wood & Wire SXSW 2012"

Listen to Overblown

Wood & Wire is one of the most promising new bands on Austin's bluegrass and acoustic scene. Mixing in elements of Americana and swing, its healthy dose of original music and traditional bluegrass tunes keep audiences riveted. The three-man band keeps people on their toes, too, with a cappella ballads, funky acoustic jams and rippin’ fast instrumentals. If you're lucky, you'll even catch them on a night when they have a banjo player.

Wood & Wire features Matt Slusher on mandolin, Tony Kamel on guitar and Dom Fisher on bass. They're joined at times by Trevor Smith on banjo. When the original trio got together last fall, things started happening quickly. From the very beginning, their chemistry made collaborating easy, and they practiced relentlessly as they built their sound. Focusing hard on three-part harmonies, thought-out arrangements, and some hard-driving pickin', everything is anchored by Dom's solid bass playing. Old tunes that Slush and Tony had written in the past were given new life, and the group's collective energy created inspiration for new songs along the way.

Anyone that has seen Wood & Wire in the act can see their enthusiasm shine through on the stage. In just a few short months, the group has already played at legendary venues such as Gruene Hall and the Cactus Cafe.

Bluegrass and acoustic music are becoming more and more popular in the Austin scene and in central Texas as a whole. The members of Wood & Wire feel privileged to be a part of a much larger community that boasts some of the best acoustic musicians in the world. They're ready to keep playing throughout Texas and neighboring states until recording an album sometime this summer. - SXSW.com


"Wood & Wire SXSW 2012"

Listen to Overblown

Wood & Wire is one of the most promising new bands on Austin's bluegrass and acoustic scene. Mixing in elements of Americana and swing, its healthy dose of original music and traditional bluegrass tunes keep audiences riveted. The three-man band keeps people on their toes, too, with a cappella ballads, funky acoustic jams and rippin’ fast instrumentals. If you're lucky, you'll even catch them on a night when they have a banjo player.

Wood & Wire features Matt Slusher on mandolin, Tony Kamel on guitar and Dom Fisher on bass. They're joined at times by Trevor Smith on banjo. When the original trio got together last fall, things started happening quickly. From the very beginning, their chemistry made collaborating easy, and they practiced relentlessly as they built their sound. Focusing hard on three-part harmonies, thought-out arrangements, and some hard-driving pickin', everything is anchored by Dom's solid bass playing. Old tunes that Slush and Tony had written in the past were given new life, and the group's collective energy created inspiration for new songs along the way.

Anyone that has seen Wood & Wire in the act can see their enthusiasm shine through on the stage. In just a few short months, the group has already played at legendary venues such as Gruene Hall and the Cactus Cafe.

Bluegrass and acoustic music are becoming more and more popular in the Austin scene and in central Texas as a whole. The members of Wood & Wire feel privileged to be a part of a much larger community that boasts some of the best acoustic musicians in the world. They're ready to keep playing throughout Texas and neighboring states until recording an album sometime this summer. - SXSW.com


"Wood & Wire SXSW 2013"

Listen to Mexico

Anyone wondering about Wood & Wire’s sound need not look any further than the four-piece band’s name, which honors the purity of acoustic instruments and the gorgeous music a skilled artist can coax out of just simple wood and wire.
The Austin-based band’s self-titled debut album, which was released on February 5, 2013, is an engaging collection of music that is deeply rooted in bluegrass traditions, although the members themselves draw upon country and Americana and listen to everything from Doc Watson to Led Zeppelin.
Founded in 2010 by guitarist Tony Kamel and mandolin player Matt Slusher, who honed their acoustic skills playing with acts like Graham Wilkinson, South Austin Jug Band and Rodney Hayden, respectively, Wood & Wire began to take form when bassist Dom Fisher joined Matt and Tony’s jam sessions. Last spring, the trio officially added Trevor Smith (Green Mountain Grass) on banjo and started making a name for itself on the Austin music scene, their infectious songs and high-energy live performances drawing fans to venues like the legendary Cactus Cafe.
Working with producer/engineer Erick Jaskowiak in Nashville, Wood & Wire cut fourteen stellar, original songs for their first album, which delivers what Smith describes as “a modern take on traditional mountain, hillbilly, and country music” and Slusher terms “Dirty Texas Grass.” The material ranges from the historical (“Coal Mining One” is set in 1940s Kentucky) to the heartbreaking (“Setting the World on Fire”) to the humorous (the raucous “Rollin’ in the Washingtons” takes a less-than-sober look at the financial situations—or lack thereof--of touring bluegrass musicians who have a taste for liquor and an eye for the ladies), and they’re all expertly arranged, thanks in part to the two band members who have had classical training. Tight, three-part harmonies, sprightly mandolin, and rolling banjo keep the band’s sound grassy, while occasional contemporary flourishes, like the electric bass and the phaser effect on “Washingtons,” speak to the group’s diverse backgrounds and far-flung musical influences. Fiddler Brittany Haas adds an extra musical layer to several of the album’s songs, including “Fool Out of Me,” a waltz that, recorded live around a single microphone, feels as though it must have been found in a dusty stack of 45s and given new life.
Touring in early 2013 with Yonder Mountain String Band, Wood & Wire is poised to have a breakout year; as they bring fiery bluegrass footstompers and loose, acoustic jams to packed venues across the country, it’ll be hard to say who’s having a better time: the band or the crowd. - SXSW.com


"Wood & Wire"

Matt Slusher, who sings and plays mandolin for Wood & Wire, calls their music Dirty Texas Grass. I tend to go with the idea of Texas Americana meets bluegrass. Or the other way around. Their songs vary from the very current to the very old, from Nowhere & Gone, a frustrated road reflection on the desire to get high while listening to Johnny Cash sing a Tom Petty song all the way to the traditional sounding but original Coal Mining One. Take a look at this and you'll know a lot more about what we're dealing with here:

After spending a good bit of time with their new self-titled record (out last month), I've signed on as a Wood & Wire Head. I'm too old to follow them around the country but I'll damn sure make time to see them when we're in the same zip code, or even close. So what is it about this particular group? Tony Kamel's vocals, for one. Stylistically, there's a sense of Tim O'Brien in some of his work. You'll have to hear the whole record to know what I mean but when he sings a new song you feel like it has been around forever.

At the end of the day it's the old/new thing that reels me in. They know how to follow a mandolin solo with a guitar solo and they aren't afraid of a banjo. The banjo is sometimes lurking in the background and other times it's on the verge of a breakdown but all the time it sounds good. The bass ties everything together, sometimes working outside the norms of bluegrass, laying down the doghouse to go electric where conditions require it.

To sum it up, listening to these guys reminds me of a trip to Telluride. If you read my stuff very much you know I've spent a lot of time in Town Park, where there's always a young band or ten with a sound that lets you know they respect the old grass but they're playing the new grass and it's okay because it all works. For me, Telluride is at its best is Saturday afternoon, which always seems to include Yonder Mountain String Band and some hot young band like Trampled By Turtles or some such. The sun always seems to shine on Saturday afternoon at Telluride and the people are up, moving to the music, and I can imagine that scene with Wood & Wire playing Mexico, the first cut on this record. I can see the hippies on the wings, dancing, and folks checking their schedule to see who the hell is this. I can see Sam Bush come out in a St. Louis Cardinals jersey and play with these guys. If any of this means anything to you you need to buy this record and if it doesn't, well, you need to buy it anyway. Trust me on this: These guys can play.

Mando Lines is on Twitter @mando_lines. - No Depression Magazine


"Wood & Wire"

Matt Slusher, who sings and plays mandolin for Wood & Wire, calls their music Dirty Texas Grass. I tend to go with the idea of Texas Americana meets bluegrass. Or the other way around. Their songs vary from the very current to the very old, from Nowhere & Gone, a frustrated road reflection on the desire to get high while listening to Johnny Cash sing a Tom Petty song all the way to the traditional sounding but original Coal Mining One. Take a look at this and you'll know a lot more about what we're dealing with here:

After spending a good bit of time with their new self-titled record (out last month), I've signed on as a Wood & Wire Head. I'm too old to follow them around the country but I'll damn sure make time to see them when we're in the same zip code, or even close. So what is it about this particular group? Tony Kamel's vocals, for one. Stylistically, there's a sense of Tim O'Brien in some of his work. You'll have to hear the whole record to know what I mean but when he sings a new song you feel like it has been around forever.

At the end of the day it's the old/new thing that reels me in. They know how to follow a mandolin solo with a guitar solo and they aren't afraid of a banjo. The banjo is sometimes lurking in the background and other times it's on the verge of a breakdown but all the time it sounds good. The bass ties everything together, sometimes working outside the norms of bluegrass, laying down the doghouse to go electric where conditions require it.

To sum it up, listening to these guys reminds me of a trip to Telluride. If you read my stuff very much you know I've spent a lot of time in Town Park, where there's always a young band or ten with a sound that lets you know they respect the old grass but they're playing the new grass and it's okay because it all works. For me, Telluride is at its best is Saturday afternoon, which always seems to include Yonder Mountain String Band and some hot young band like Trampled By Turtles or some such. The sun always seems to shine on Saturday afternoon at Telluride and the people are up, moving to the music, and I can imagine that scene with Wood & Wire playing Mexico, the first cut on this record. I can see the hippies on the wings, dancing, and folks checking their schedule to see who the hell is this. I can see Sam Bush come out in a St. Louis Cardinals jersey and play with these guys. If any of this means anything to you you need to buy this record and if it doesn't, well, you need to buy it anyway. Trust me on this: These guys can play.

Mando Lines is on Twitter @mando_lines. - No Depression Magazine


"Wood & Wire Brings Bluegrass-Based Approach to the White Horse"

Name: Wood & Wire

Featured track: "Coal Mining One"

Country/City of origin: Austin, Texas

Genre: Bluegrass

In one sentence: A blend of traditional and modern bluegrass elements drawing upon everything from Doc Watson to Led Zeppelin.

Why we chose them: This local bluegrass band is poised for a breakout in 2013. If you miss them closing out SXSW at Austin's favorite East Side saloon, catch them in the Hill Country setting of Old Settler's Festival in April.

SXSW official showcase: Saturday, March 16 at The White Horse
- Culture Map Austin


"Wood & Wire Heats Up Bluegrass"

Watch out bluegrass players - there are new young guns in town and they're playing for keeps. Wood & Wire's self-titled debt album is all you'd want in bluegrass - rapid fire pickin' woven among lyrics full of the black hat cowboy antics.

But the Austin-based band isn't just about rollickin' pickin' and exuberant singing, accented by melt-in-your-mouth three-part harmonies. You'll hear the band's diversity when they shift gears into slower paced, contemplative tunes such as on “Nowhere and Gone” and even a waltz, “Fool Outta Me.”
Watch for the group at SXSW and on various tours - and don't be surprised if they're headlining some big-time tours in the not too distant future.
- See more at: http://www.thealternateroot.com/breaking-news/973-wood-wire-heats-up-bluegrass#sthash.KT9KHL1j.dpuf - The Alternate Root


"Wood & Wire Heats Up Bluegrass"

Watch out bluegrass players - there are new young guns in town and they're playing for keeps. Wood & Wire's self-titled debt album is all you'd want in bluegrass - rapid fire pickin' woven among lyrics full of the black hat cowboy antics.

But the Austin-based band isn't just about rollickin' pickin' and exuberant singing, accented by melt-in-your-mouth three-part harmonies. You'll hear the band's diversity when they shift gears into slower paced, contemplative tunes such as on “Nowhere and Gone” and even a waltz, “Fool Outta Me.”
Watch for the group at SXSW and on various tours - and don't be surprised if they're headlining some big-time tours in the not too distant future.
- See more at: http://www.thealternateroot.com/breaking-news/973-wood-wire-heats-up-bluegrass#sthash.KT9KHL1j.dpuf - The Alternate Root


"Album Reviews - Wood & Wire"

Long before I actually realized they were a band, this Austin bluegrass quartet was blowing my mind during many a late-night campfire jam at the Old Settler's Music Festival. With the release of their first LP, Wood & Wire has come a long way since those sessions, and it shows. Compared to groups like the Infamous Stringdusters and Yonder Mountain String Band, Wood & Wire have a sound that, on first listen, is more rooted in traditional bluegrass. However, lyrically and musically, the new album is all over the map. "Mexico" starts off on a lively note with the story of an outlaw bound for the border and speedy guitar picking. "Nowhere & Gone" channels the likes of Billy Joe Shaver with bluegrass instrumentals, while "Overblown" is a catchy adventure tune. "Nothin' Wrong" is a tightly played instrumental tune that showcases each member's individual talents and ability to stay true to the form. "Rollin' in the Washingtons" is a hyper-active rollicking ride that makes light of (for better or worse) tumultuous life as a bluegrass musician. For their first album Wood & Wire have put out a solid collection of songs that easily establish them as one of Austin's finest bluegrass acts, and it is sure to satisfy genre traditionalists as well as those looking for something a little outside the bluegrass box.
-Neil Ferguson - The Horn


"Album Reviews - Wood & Wire"

Long before I actually realized they were a band, this Austin bluegrass quartet was blowing my mind during many a late-night campfire jam at the Old Settler's Music Festival. With the release of their first LP, Wood & Wire has come a long way since those sessions, and it shows. Compared to groups like the Infamous Stringdusters and Yonder Mountain String Band, Wood & Wire have a sound that, on first listen, is more rooted in traditional bluegrass. However, lyrically and musically, the new album is all over the map. "Mexico" starts off on a lively note with the story of an outlaw bound for the border and speedy guitar picking. "Nowhere & Gone" channels the likes of Billy Joe Shaver with bluegrass instrumentals, while "Overblown" is a catchy adventure tune. "Nothin' Wrong" is a tightly played instrumental tune that showcases each member's individual talents and ability to stay true to the form. "Rollin' in the Washingtons" is a hyper-active rollicking ride that makes light of (for better or worse) tumultuous life as a bluegrass musician. For their first album Wood & Wire have put out a solid collection of songs that easily establish them as one of Austin's finest bluegrass acts, and it is sure to satisfy genre traditionalists as well as those looking for something a little outside the bluegrass box.
-Neil Ferguson - The Horn


"Wood & Wire Does Bluegrass Right - interview"

Bluegrass has come a long way from its humble beginnings as Appalachian roots music. The explosion of acoustic-based pop acts like The Avett Brothers and Mumford & Sons have made it more common than ever before to hear a banjo in a Top 40 song. While those bands are definitely not bluegrass, the use of bluegrass instruments and musical techniques has given the form plenty of exposure to those who may have otherwise not discovered it. Regardless of your opinion of those acts, anything that leads to more interest in one of America’s greatest contributions to music is not a bad thing.

Those acts, along with the popularity of groups like Yonder Mountain String Band, Infamous Stringdusters, and Railroad Earth in the jam band community, have led to a recent explosion of bluegrass acts around the country. Austin has never had a major bluegrass scene, but now we have one of the finest acts around to call our own. Having jammed for years together at the Old Settler’s Music Festival, the bluegrass quartet Wood & Wire have just released their first self-titled LP. With the release of the new album, a string of dates opening for Yonder Mountain String Band, and official slots at South By Southwest and Old Settler’s Music Festival, Wood & Wire have a busy year ahead of them. Recently I spoke to guitar player Tony Kamel about the new album and catching the bluegrass bug.
Your new album was recorded in Nashville. Can you talk about why the band decided to record there and not Austin?
We have been to Nashville several times, and there were a couple of reasons why we wanted to [record] there. The number one reason was that we had heard about the guy who produced it through a friend of ours, Carl Miner, who plays guitar for The Greencards and also for Sara Watkins. He told us about this guy Erick Jaskowiak who has his own studio and is an incredible sound engineer. Erick is one of the best sound engineers in the business and one of the best people who you’ve never heard of.
He had done some producing but was getting to the point where he wanted to do more. We weren’t looking to break the bank on a well-known producer, but we wanted to get a really good product. On top of that, we wanted to get away from where we live (Austin) and really focus on the project, as opposed to going to the studio every day and then coming home and staying in our routines.

I’m curious to hear who influenced you both inside and outside the genre and style of bluegrass?
You’ll hear this frequently from some bluegrass players, but I listened to rock. I listened to a lot of things as a kid, but I was really in to hard rock. I became really interested in playing fast when I started listening to Ozzy Osbourne. There was a guitar player he had named Randy Rhodes (of Quiet Riot) that would just shred, and that’s when I really became interested; just the concept of playing fast and difficult guitar licks. I started getting in to jam bands in high school and college, and there were a few jam bands out there that teased bluegrass, like Phish and String Cheese Incident.

Did you and your bandmates all grow up wanting to play bluegrass? How did you wind up down that path?
I did not, personally, and I can speak for my bandmates when I say they did not grow up being in to bluegrass at all. When I figured out that I liked bluegrass it was sometime in college, and I started delving in to traditional bluegrass and listening to it more and more. A little over 4 years ago I started playing that style of guitar, and the year before that I became really obsessed with Doc Watson. To this day he is the biggest inspiration behind the style that I play, and not just on guitar. Once I started listening to Doc I decided to basically lock myself in my house and try to learn what he was doing.
[Mandolin player] Matt Slusher was a punk rocker growing up and he eventually got in to country music. Trevor Smith, our banjo player, was actually a classically trained piano player. His parents took him to a bluegrass festival and he decided he wanted to learn how to play the banjo. Dom Fisher is a classically trained jazz bass player. So we all sort of came on a little bit later.
You guys seem to have a little bit of history with Green Mountain Grass and the Bluegrass Outfit. How did you connect with those guys and can you talk about the scene around those bands and musicians?
The [bluegrass] community in Austin is small, so everyone kind of knows each other, which is actually true on a national level too; it’s a small scene overall. But here in Austin it’s even smaller. From my perspective, I was simply a fan of Green Mountain Grass, and I had seen them many times, especially at the Old Settler’s Music Festival.
Over the years what kind of brought it together for me was the Bluegrass Outfit in some ways, because the Bluegrass Outfit is not a real band. It’s a culmination of players from around town. We’re all in other bands essentially, and we come t - The Horn


"Wood & Wire - Wood & Wire"

Here it is Friday afternoon before a long weekend for most, and spring break for many (or Ski Week, as it’s called here on the left coast). For lots of people that means a road trip of some kind, and I can’t think of anything better for a long drive than some bluegrass. Fortunately the debut release from Austin-based Wood & Wire came out last week, and it’s a fine, fine bluegrass album in the vein of Old Crow Medicine Show or Yonder Mountain String Band.

Featuring former members of South Austin Jug Band and Green Mountain Grass among others, Wood & Wire build on a couple of musical themes in their self-titled recording debut. The first vein is a slightly cynical version of the world from the perspective of a ne’er-do-well. Mexico tells of an escapee’s run to the border, complete with the presumably mirror-shaded pursuer’s constant admonition, “what say you lay down that gun, son.” Nowhere and Gone reminds us of the less glamourous side of being on the road, and is punched up with some fine fiddle from guest Brittany Haas. My favorite of the entire album, though, is Rollin’ In the Washingtons. While much of America thinks stacks of hundreds is what defines excess, the boys in the band sing an ode to how much fun starving musicians can have with a much more modest stash.

The second musical vein is a more traditional bluegrass set. Bet the World with its chorus of “I bet the whole damn world that the sun don’t shine like it does when you’re mine”, is an unabashed love song. Coal Mining One tells of the time when the company store was the place that had everything you needed, even if it had nothing you wanted. Fool Out Of Me is, in my opinion, the best of this lot. Recorded around a single microphone, it just oozes Depression-era acoustics with the sweet vocal harmonies.

On a final note I have to mention that the nucleus of Wood & Wire came out of a late, late night jam at one of my favorite festivals, Old Settler’s Music Fest. It just goes to show you can’t predict inspiration, but if you’re open to hearing something new you can absolutely witness it. - Twangville.com


"Wood & Wire - Wood & Wire"

Here it is Friday afternoon before a long weekend for most, and spring break for many (or Ski Week, as it’s called here on the left coast). For lots of people that means a road trip of some kind, and I can’t think of anything better for a long drive than some bluegrass. Fortunately the debut release from Austin-based Wood & Wire came out last week, and it’s a fine, fine bluegrass album in the vein of Old Crow Medicine Show or Yonder Mountain String Band.

Featuring former members of South Austin Jug Band and Green Mountain Grass among others, Wood & Wire build on a couple of musical themes in their self-titled recording debut. The first vein is a slightly cynical version of the world from the perspective of a ne’er-do-well. Mexico tells of an escapee’s run to the border, complete with the presumably mirror-shaded pursuer’s constant admonition, “what say you lay down that gun, son.” Nowhere and Gone reminds us of the less glamourous side of being on the road, and is punched up with some fine fiddle from guest Brittany Haas. My favorite of the entire album, though, is Rollin’ In the Washingtons. While much of America thinks stacks of hundreds is what defines excess, the boys in the band sing an ode to how much fun starving musicians can have with a much more modest stash.

The second musical vein is a more traditional bluegrass set. Bet the World with its chorus of “I bet the whole damn world that the sun don’t shine like it does when you’re mine”, is an unabashed love song. Coal Mining One tells of the time when the company store was the place that had everything you needed, even if it had nothing you wanted. Fool Out Of Me is, in my opinion, the best of this lot. Recorded around a single microphone, it just oozes Depression-era acoustics with the sweet vocal harmonies.

On a final note I have to mention that the nucleus of Wood & Wire came out of a late, late night jam at one of my favorite festivals, Old Settler’s Music Fest. It just goes to show you can’t predict inspiration, but if you’re open to hearing something new you can absolutely witness it. - Twangville.com


"New Music Review - Wood & Wire"

They say everything is bigger in Texas and as far as Wood and Wire from Austin, Texas sound goes, the band goes plenty big on their self titled CD, Wood and Wire. Wood and Wire offers the bluegrass sound that has been a staple of American culture since Bill Monroe and his band first got the bluegrass ball rolling. With the opening notes of the first song and throughout the entire CD, Wood and Wire dispels any myth that bluegrass is best straight out of the Appalachia area of the United States. Wood and Wire has the old school banjo rolls along with the picking AND the grinning plus the vocals that create the high lonesome sound that all bluegrass bands strive to deliver.

As for rolling, as in Earl Scruggs’ type banjo rolls, not late night raving or bouncing down the street while sipping gin and juice, banjo player Trevor Smith comes out smoking on the album’s first track Mexico and does not let up on the banjo for the duration of this album. If you have a thing for the blings and twangs of a banjo, you can stop reading this now and get this CD. If you need more from your bluegrass than a crisp and clear banjo blazing or slowed down to a more melancholy soulful pace, Tony Kamel on guitar, Matt Slusher on mandolin, Dom Fisher on bass along with special guest Brittany Haas of Crooked Still on fiddle have all your bluegrass needs covered. Each of these musicians has a mastery of their instrument and all shine as their opportunity arises to step up for a solo.

The CD is full of original material including the instrumentals Nothing Wrong, and Overblown(Reprise). Depending on how deep your bluegrass roots go, one thing you may notice with Wood and Wire’s efforts is the absence of any “Newgrass”. Covering Michael Jackson’s Billie Jean, a Talking Head’s song or a hit song of Billboard’s Top 40 is a fun way to bring what may be considered hillbilly, boondocks music to a wider audience but for those already initiated to bluegrass, songs performed in a “Newgrass” style is not a necessity. Listeners among Wood and Wire’s audience not needing a catchy bluegrass twist on a pop song will appreciate how the band keeps their music real and well grounded in the classic bluegrass style.

To put Wood and Wire’s bluegrass talents in the words of a little, old three piece rock and roll band from Texas, these folks “work it from one end to another and all points in between”.

- See more at: http://www.gratefulweb.com/articles/wood-and-wire-wood-wire-new-music-review#sthash.YTvmvyUy.dpuf - The Grateful Web


"New Music Review - Wood & Wire"

They say everything is bigger in Texas and as far as Wood and Wire from Austin, Texas sound goes, the band goes plenty big on their self titled CD, Wood and Wire. Wood and Wire offers the bluegrass sound that has been a staple of American culture since Bill Monroe and his band first got the bluegrass ball rolling. With the opening notes of the first song and throughout the entire CD, Wood and Wire dispels any myth that bluegrass is best straight out of the Appalachia area of the United States. Wood and Wire has the old school banjo rolls along with the picking AND the grinning plus the vocals that create the high lonesome sound that all bluegrass bands strive to deliver.

As for rolling, as in Earl Scruggs’ type banjo rolls, not late night raving or bouncing down the street while sipping gin and juice, banjo player Trevor Smith comes out smoking on the album’s first track Mexico and does not let up on the banjo for the duration of this album. If you have a thing for the blings and twangs of a banjo, you can stop reading this now and get this CD. If you need more from your bluegrass than a crisp and clear banjo blazing or slowed down to a more melancholy soulful pace, Tony Kamel on guitar, Matt Slusher on mandolin, Dom Fisher on bass along with special guest Brittany Haas of Crooked Still on fiddle have all your bluegrass needs covered. Each of these musicians has a mastery of their instrument and all shine as their opportunity arises to step up for a solo.

The CD is full of original material including the instrumentals Nothing Wrong, and Overblown(Reprise). Depending on how deep your bluegrass roots go, one thing you may notice with Wood and Wire’s efforts is the absence of any “Newgrass”. Covering Michael Jackson’s Billie Jean, a Talking Head’s song or a hit song of Billboard’s Top 40 is a fun way to bring what may be considered hillbilly, boondocks music to a wider audience but for those already initiated to bluegrass, songs performed in a “Newgrass” style is not a necessity. Listeners among Wood and Wire’s audience not needing a catchy bluegrass twist on a pop song will appreciate how the band keeps their music real and well grounded in the classic bluegrass style.

To put Wood and Wire’s bluegrass talents in the words of a little, old three piece rock and roll band from Texas, these folks “work it from one end to another and all points in between”.

- See more at: http://www.gratefulweb.com/articles/wood-and-wire-wood-wire-new-music-review#sthash.YTvmvyUy.dpuf - The Grateful Web


"Video from Wood & Wire"

Austin’s Wood & Wire has released their debut, self-titled and self-produced album. The quartet has been together since 2010, founded by guitarist Tony Kamel and mandolinist Matt Slusher. They are joined by Trevor Smith on banjo and Dom Fisher on bass. Together, they wrote and arranged […] - Bluegrass Today


"Video from Wood & Wire"

Austin’s Wood & Wire has released their debut, self-titled and self-produced album. The quartet has been together since 2010, founded by guitarist Tony Kamel and mandolinist Matt Slusher. They are joined by Trevor Smith on banjo and Dom Fisher on bass. Together, they wrote and arranged […] - Bluegrass Today


"UT Austin article on Cactus Cafe"

This summer marks two years since The University of Texas at Austin announced its partnership with KUT 90.5 to program the Cactus Cafe, the iconic listening room in the Texas Union that featured artists such as Lyle Lovett, Robert Earl Keen, Lucinda Williams, Shawn Colvin, Nanci Griffith and Ani DiFranco early in their careers.


Austin bluegrass ensemble Wood & Wire was the Cactus Artist in Residence in March.
Since KUT formally began programming the Cactus in mid-August 2010, the public radio station has worked to continue the music line-ups that built the venue’s reputation. In fact, the listening room continues its 11-year run as “Best Acoustic Venue” in the 2012 Austin Chronicle Music Poll.

Although the best attributes of the Cactus have remained the same, some aspects of the venue have evolved. For example, jazz and classical guitar can be heard; music fans can purchase tickets online in advance of shows; and new audiences are going to the Cactus to discuss music, sports, politics and faculty research.

Artists in Residence

Last spring, the Cactus launched an artist-in-residence program, a four-week residency designed to continue the venue’s tradition of providing a platform for promising local talent. The shows are free to the public in hopes of broadening exposure for the artists.

Singer-songwriter David Ramirez was the inaugural artist in April 2011, followed by Hello Wheels in September and Wood & Wire in March. The Carper Family Band, an Austin-based all-female trio singing old country, swing and bluegrass, will be the June artist-in-residence. This year, Lone Star Beer is sponsoring the artist-in-resident program to support the free concert series.

In addition to their weekly show at the Cactus, artists-in-residence receive on-air exposure on KUT 90.5 and KUT.org, in the form of the KUT Song of the Day and the Austin Music Minute, and through KUT’s social media channels.


Alternative country/Texas country singer, guitarist and songwriter Dale Watson performs at the Cactus Cafe.
“We’ve been really pleased with the artist and public response to the residency series,” says Matt Munoz, manager of the Cactus Cafe. “All three of the artist-in-residence shows so far have been at or near capacity, and we anticipate the same for the Carper family this month.”

Expanding the Genre

Munoz says that when scheduling shows, he tries to strike a balance between new and established performers. “We’ve had great runs with classic Cactus artists such as Terri Hendrix, Robert Earl Keen, Ruthie Foster, California Guitar Trio, Over the Rhine and Bob Mould,” he said.

“Some of our most successful shows in the past two years played the Cactus for the first time, including blues, soul and folk singer-songwriter Citizen Cope’s four sold-out nights last April, folk-country-duo The Civil Wars show in the Texas Union Ballroom last July, indie and alternative rock singer-songwriter Mike Doughty and alternative country band Lambchop this spring.”

In the spirit of diversifying musical genres, the Cactus formed a partnership with the Austin Classical Guitar Society last spring to produce “Classical Cactus,” featuring up-and-coming local and regional classical guitarists playing one Thursday night per month during the spring and fall semesters.

“Soon after partnering with the Cactus, KUT approached me about ways our two organizations could collaborate, and soon after the ‘Classical Cactus’ series was born,” said Matthew Hinsley, executive director of the Austin Classical Guitar Society. “In the classical music world we dream of creating events with a casual atmosphere and that have no barriers to entry, and the ‘Classical Cactus’ series does just that.”

The series recently concluded its fourth installment and, thanks to a partnership with KMFA, Classically Austin 89.5, “Classical Cactus” concerts are recorded and rebroadcast.

A second broadcast partnership, with ESPN’s Longhorn Network, delivers select Cactu - UT Austin


"90.5 KUT Song of the Day"

Tonight Austin bluegrass trio Wood & Wire begins a month-long, Monday night residency at the Cactus Cafe.

The group consists of mandolin player Matt Slusher (who was a founding member of the South Austin Jug Band), Dom Fisher on bass and Tony Kamel on guitar. Wood & Wire officially formed in October 2011, but the three have known each other for quite some time through the intricate webs of the bluegrass scene. Slusher met Kamel during a 2009 jam at the Old Settlers fest in 2009, and Kamel plays with Fisher in other bluegrass groups like My Pet Possum and Flatiron.

Wood & Wire doesn’t have an official release yet, but they’ve recorded a handful of tracks that show off their energy in the live setting. Today’s song of the day is a tune called “Rambler’s Blues.” It’s a fast-paced, bouncy number that should definitely get a Cactus Cafe crowd on their feet. - KUT.org


"Wood & Wire live on KUT 3/26/12"

Austin bluegrass trio Wood and Wire is so new to the scene that you can almost smell the metaphorical paint drying. The band only got together last fall, but the rate this band has picked up momentum is astounding. But don’t be mistaken, that momentum is no accident. The three of them, Matt Slusher, Dom Fisher and Tony Kamel are all experienced musicians – Slusher being a founding member of the South Austin Jug Band and Fisher and Kamel being a part of several bluegrass bands in town. That experience and their chemistry as a band leads to some great music, with 3 part harmonies, thoroughly thought-out arrangements and just impressive instrumental work all coming together to make for a fantastic live show. You can also hear their live set from KUT RIGHT HERE! - KUT.org


"Wood & Wire and Milkdrive at The Cactus"

One of my favorite things to do is to hear great live music—preferably bluegrass—especially at hard-to-beat, legendary venues like the Cactus Cafe. Possibly even more exciting is the opportunity to witness the fresh, raw, eager musical talent right before my eyes. Such has been the case since I first met Tony Kamel at CTBA’s annual band scramble a couple of years ago (where I shamelessly approached him to become a member--- which he did) and was now watching his less-than-four-month-old band play at the Cactus Cafe on November 17. Tony’s band Wood & Wire had been asked to open for the amazing Austin alt-folk-progressive acous- tic string band MilkDrive, who released their debut studio album ROAD FROM HOME earlier this year. Without question, it’s amazing to watch MilkDrive’s master instrument technicians Noah Jeffries, Dennis Ludiker, Brian Beken, & Matt Mefford weave their musical talents together seam- lessly. But it’s equally inspiring to watch a musician like Tony Kamel, who only found his way to bluegrass and onto a public stage less than a cou- ple of years ago. Tony’s journey to and through the bluegrassy maze in- cluded stops at Artz Rib House for Sunday afternoon jams, Eddie Collin’s open mic nights at New World Deli, all-night jamming at local festivals in-cluding Old Settler’s, AFTM’s Austin Stringband Festival, and RiceGrass,
and Craigslist postings to link up with other musicians who wanted to
play bluegrass. Although Tony has been playing and singing most of
his life, he had mostly played only electric guitar. He told me that he re-
calls hearing Stringed Cheese Incident while he was in high school and
realizing, “Hey, I really like this bluegrass stuff!” After playing around
town with two of his early projects, Flatiron and My Pet Possum, Tony is
excited about his newest trio project that features mostly bluegrass and
Americana, sprinkled with swing elements and original music. Tony’s
talented bandmates are Matt Slusher (founding member of South Aus-
tin Jug Band) and Dom Fisher, who just moved to Austin two years ago
from Nashville and also studied jazz at Ithaca College in New York. They
put on a great opening show with high energy and passionate execu-
tion and were even joined by MikDrive’s Dennis Ludiker on fiddle for
a tune. For a guy who’s pretty new to the scene and doesn’t do mu-
sic for a living, he’s feeling pretty blessed to be playing the music he
loves with such fine musicians--not to mention having his dreams come
true of playing at both Gruene Hall and Cactus Cafe in the last couple
of months. Tony can also be seen frequently on Monday nights playing
with Bluegrass Outfit at Flipnotics and on Wednesday nights in San Mar-
cos at Tantra Coffee House. I hope you’ll get the chance to check out some of these great musical offerings. It’s been fun watching you, Tony, and we’re looking forward to hearing more from you! For more information, check out Wood & Wire’s facebook page at www.facebook. com/woodandwire or for booking information, you can email woodan- dwireband@gmail.com. -Jami Hampton - centraltexasbluegrass.org


"Wood & Wire and Milkdrive at The Cactus"

One of my favorite things to do is to hear great live music—preferably bluegrass—especially at hard-to-beat, legendary venues like the Cactus Cafe. Possibly even more exciting is the opportunity to witness the fresh, raw, eager musical talent right before my eyes. Such has been the case since I first met Tony Kamel at CTBA’s annual band scramble a couple of years ago (where I shamelessly approached him to become a member--- which he did) and was now watching his less-than-four-month-old band play at the Cactus Cafe on November 17. Tony’s band Wood & Wire had been asked to open for the amazing Austin alt-folk-progressive acous- tic string band MilkDrive, who released their debut studio album ROAD FROM HOME earlier this year. Without question, it’s amazing to watch MilkDrive’s master instrument technicians Noah Jeffries, Dennis Ludiker, Brian Beken, & Matt Mefford weave their musical talents together seam- lessly. But it’s equally inspiring to watch a musician like Tony Kamel, who only found his way to bluegrass and onto a public stage less than a cou- ple of years ago. Tony’s journey to and through the bluegrassy maze in- cluded stops at Artz Rib House for Sunday afternoon jams, Eddie Collin’s open mic nights at New World Deli, all-night jamming at local festivals in-cluding Old Settler’s, AFTM’s Austin Stringband Festival, and RiceGrass,
and Craigslist postings to link up with other musicians who wanted to
play bluegrass. Although Tony has been playing and singing most of
his life, he had mostly played only electric guitar. He told me that he re-
calls hearing Stringed Cheese Incident while he was in high school and
realizing, “Hey, I really like this bluegrass stuff!” After playing around
town with two of his early projects, Flatiron and My Pet Possum, Tony is
excited about his newest trio project that features mostly bluegrass and
Americana, sprinkled with swing elements and original music. Tony’s
talented bandmates are Matt Slusher (founding member of South Aus-
tin Jug Band) and Dom Fisher, who just moved to Austin two years ago
from Nashville and also studied jazz at Ithaca College in New York. They
put on a great opening show with high energy and passionate execu-
tion and were even joined by MikDrive’s Dennis Ludiker on fiddle for
a tune. For a guy who’s pretty new to the scene and doesn’t do mu-
sic for a living, he’s feeling pretty blessed to be playing the music he
loves with such fine musicians--not to mention having his dreams come
true of playing at both Gruene Hall and Cactus Cafe in the last couple
of months. Tony can also be seen frequently on Monday nights playing
with Bluegrass Outfit at Flipnotics and on Wednesday nights in San Mar-
cos at Tantra Coffee House. I hope you’ll get the chance to check out some of these great musical offerings. It’s been fun watching you, Tony, and we’re looking forward to hearing more from you! For more information, check out Wood & Wire’s facebook page at www.facebook. com/woodandwire or for booking information, you can email woodan- dwireband@gmail.com. -Jami Hampton - centraltexasbluegrass.org


"CMT.com SXSW: 10 Country Music Ideas"

If you're arriving in Austin, Texas, this week for South by Southwest (SXSW), you ought to seek out some country music. It's an ideal way to get a feel for the local culture and it sure goes down easy with a cold beer or two. With the music conference taking place Tuesday-Sunday (March 13-18), here are 10 showcasing artists from the Lone Star State who merit a listen.

A new Austin band called Crooks is causing the locals to take notice. Already they've been praised by local radio station KUT and The Austin American Statesman. They go on at the White Horse at midnight Thursday. Rugged and lonesome, this style of country music makes you want to keep your tab open.

The Carper Family are quite intriguing, although its members aren't actually related. These three gals mix old country, old-time, bluegrass and swing tunes into their original catalog. Their harmonious blend recalls a simpler time, yet one of their numbers is titled "Who R U Textin 2nite." Get dialed into their sound on Saturday at 11 p.m. at Stephen F's.

Brennen Leigh is a young woman who sounds like an old soul. A fantastic singer of traditional country music, she's lately been inspired by bluegrass music. She's part of an all-country lineup at the White Horse on Friday night. If you can stay up until 1 a.m., you'll enjoy Mike and the Moonpies, who take pride in getting country dancers on the floor.

Bluegrass fans can pick a few new favorites this year, too. Whiskey Shivers pursue an Appalachian path with their old-time music at Maggie Mae's Gibson Room on Friday at 1 a.m. But if you're more of an early-evening listener, seek out Wire & Wood, an enthusiastic trio (or quartet if the banjo player shows up) at the White Horse at 8 p.m. on Saturday.

Two respected veterans of the Texas singer-songwriter scene are showcasing on Wednesday night. Ray Wylie Hubbard, a spiritual guru to the current crop of Texas talent, plays at midnight at the White Horse. Right after that, Billy Joe Shaver takes the stage. One of Waylon Jennings' favorite songwriters, nine out of the 10 songs on the original 1973 release of Jennings' Honky Tonk Heroes album were written or co-written by Shaver. Of course, Shaver's modern masterpiece is probably "Live Forever." It's sentimental, sure, but it can really put a smile on your face. If you're arriving later in the week, fear not. This pair will also play Saxon Pub on Friday starting at 10 p.m.

For a more contemporary take on country music, try the rugged original tunes by Scooter Brown on Thursday at 11 p.m. at Skinny's Lounge. Another promising artist is Hudson Moore, a young songwriter who's just getting started in his career. If you like Taylor Swift, I think you'll like Hudson Moore, too. He plays Friday at 8 p.m. at Maggie Mae's Gibson Room and Saturday at 10 p.m. at Saxon Pub. - CMT.com


"CMT.com SXSW: 10 Country Music Ideas"

If you're arriving in Austin, Texas, this week for South by Southwest (SXSW), you ought to seek out some country music. It's an ideal way to get a feel for the local culture and it sure goes down easy with a cold beer or two. With the music conference taking place Tuesday-Sunday (March 13-18), here are 10 showcasing artists from the Lone Star State who merit a listen.

A new Austin band called Crooks is causing the locals to take notice. Already they've been praised by local radio station KUT and The Austin American Statesman. They go on at the White Horse at midnight Thursday. Rugged and lonesome, this style of country music makes you want to keep your tab open.

The Carper Family are quite intriguing, although its members aren't actually related. These three gals mix old country, old-time, bluegrass and swing tunes into their original catalog. Their harmonious blend recalls a simpler time, yet one of their numbers is titled "Who R U Textin 2nite." Get dialed into their sound on Saturday at 11 p.m. at Stephen F's.

Brennen Leigh is a young woman who sounds like an old soul. A fantastic singer of traditional country music, she's lately been inspired by bluegrass music. She's part of an all-country lineup at the White Horse on Friday night. If you can stay up until 1 a.m., you'll enjoy Mike and the Moonpies, who take pride in getting country dancers on the floor.

Bluegrass fans can pick a few new favorites this year, too. Whiskey Shivers pursue an Appalachian path with their old-time music at Maggie Mae's Gibson Room on Friday at 1 a.m. But if you're more of an early-evening listener, seek out Wire & Wood, an enthusiastic trio (or quartet if the banjo player shows up) at the White Horse at 8 p.m. on Saturday.

Two respected veterans of the Texas singer-songwriter scene are showcasing on Wednesday night. Ray Wylie Hubbard, a spiritual guru to the current crop of Texas talent, plays at midnight at the White Horse. Right after that, Billy Joe Shaver takes the stage. One of Waylon Jennings' favorite songwriters, nine out of the 10 songs on the original 1973 release of Jennings' Honky Tonk Heroes album were written or co-written by Shaver. Of course, Shaver's modern masterpiece is probably "Live Forever." It's sentimental, sure, but it can really put a smile on your face. If you're arriving later in the week, fear not. This pair will also play Saxon Pub on Friday starting at 10 p.m.

For a more contemporary take on country music, try the rugged original tunes by Scooter Brown on Thursday at 11 p.m. at Skinny's Lounge. Another promising artist is Hudson Moore, a young songwriter who's just getting started in his career. If you like Taylor Swift, I think you'll like Hudson Moore, too. He plays Friday at 8 p.m. at Maggie Mae's Gibson Room and Saturday at 10 p.m. at Saxon Pub. - CMT.com


"90.5 KUT Austin Music Minute #1"

Okay. Granted, the gentlemen of Wood and Wire aren’t necessarily new kids on the block. After all, mandolinist Matt Slusher is one of the founders of the South Austin Jug Band, and of course guitarist Tony Kamel, and bassist Dom Fisher have a lot of experience performing. But the bluegrass trio is a relatively new band to the scene – one that’s quickly gaining momentum.

They first got together last fall and started rehearsing almost immediately, polishing up some incredible three-part harmonies, putting together a set list with both traditional and plenty of new tunes, and letting loose with their intense, rapid-fire picking. That’s what pulls you in. There’s no mistaking that electrifying chemistry between the musicians. A lot of thought goes into each arrangement, but they make it seem so effortless with a genuine, infectious enthusiasm. Then, quite humbly, they remind everyone of how fortunate they are “to be a part of a much larger community that boasts some of the best acoustic musicians in the world.”

Looks like there are plans for recording a new album this summer. Meanwhile, don’t miss Wood and Wire as they begin their March residency tonight at the Cactus Cafe, at 24th St. and Guadalupe, in the Texas Union on the UT campus. Songwriter Shawn Nelson is opening the show. Doors open at 8 p.m. and the show starts at 8:30 p.m. Recommended. - KUT.org


"90.5 KUT Austin Music Minute #2"

Okay. Granted, the gentlemen of Wood and Wire aren’t necessarily new kids on the block. Mandolinist Matt Slusher is one of the founders of the South Austin Jug Band, and of course guitarist Tony Kamel, and bassist Dom Fisher have a lot of shows behind them. Collectively, though, the bluegrass trio is a relatively new band to the scene – one that’s quickly gaining momentum.

They first got together last fall and started rehearsing almost immediately, polishing up some incredible three-part harmonies, putting together a set list with both traditional and plenty of new tunes, and letting loose with their intense, rapid-fire picking. That’s what pulls you in. There’s no mistaking that electrifying chemistry between the musicians. A lot of thought goes into each arrangement, but they make it seem so effortless with a genuine, infectious enthusiasm. Then, quite humbly, they remind everyone of how fortunate they are “to be a part of a much larger community that boasts some of the best acoustic musicians in the world.”

If you haven’t had the chance to see Wood and Wire yet, do yourself a favor and see them tonight as they wrap up their residency at the Cactus Cafe, 24th St. and Guadalupe, in the Texas Union on the UT campus. Doors open at 8 p.m., and the music gets underway at 8:30 p.m. Recommended. - KUT.org


"Cactus Cafe Show Review"

I don’t make New Year’s resolutions any more. They tend to go largely unfulfilled after a few weeks (at most), and if I want to make some sort of big life change, I don’t want to trivialize it with a New Year’s resolution. Which doesn’t even make sense as I read it back, but screw it. No resolutions. However…if I was going to resolve anything this year, it would have been to get more involved in the non-indie-rock elements of the Austin music scene this year. We covered a lot of artists in that genre last year, but there’s so much here to get to. One of my favorite non-rock genres that Austin happens to have in great abundance is bluegrass. We’ve gotten to Whiskey Shivers, but I believe that’s been the extent of our bluegrass coverage thus far, so when I stumbled across Wood & Wire, I saw it as an opportunity to make inroads into that scene. Fortunately, they also happen to be really good.
On Monday night, I made my way down to the Cactus Cafe for the first time to see the last night of Wood & Wire’s residency there. I showed up mid-way through the opener’s set and wasn’t even let in the door because the place was jam-packed. Fortunately, the room opened up a bit in between sets, and I took a seat near the stage for Wood & Wire’s set. There were certainly moments that indicated the new-ness of this band – a flat harmony here, a flipped beat there – but those slight instances were overshadowed by the fabulous musicianship and joyous energy the group brought to the stage. If anything, their rawness was endearing and made the excellence on display even more enjoyable. Performing a mixture of bluegrass standards and W&W originals, they brought the crowd to its feet by the end of the performance.
Wood & Wire isn’t as “hip” as Whiskey Shivers, or the even more obscene Clyde & Clem’s Whiskey Business (who I’m hoping to cover here shortly), but they are a great bluegrass group. Mandolin player Matt Slusher was a member of the South Austin Jug Band, and guitarist Tony Kamel and bassist Dom Fisher have played in multiple bluegrass groups around the area. They combine traditional elements of the genre with some of the newer, more progressive styles, and have great songs to boot. They’re brand new, with nothing but a handful of demos for fans to enjoy, but this is a group to put on your radar for something a little different from the traditional Red River fare. Of course we’ll let you know when the official releases inevitably turn up.

- Carter - Ovrlrd.com


Discography

Wood & Wire, Self Titled, 2013

Photos

Bio

Anyone wondering about Wood & Wire’s sound need not look any further than the four-piece band’s name, which honors the purity of acoustic instruments and the gorgeous music a skilled artist can coax out of just simple wood and wire.

Founded in 2011, Wood & Wire’s core members are Tony Kamel on lead vocals and guitar, Dominic Fisher on Bass, and Trevor Smith on Banjo.  Their sound, as Smith puts it, is “a modern take on traditional mountain, hillbilly, and country music”.  In just a few short years, the band has had the honor of playing notable festivals and venues across the country like The Telluride Bluegrass Festival and Old Settlers Music Festival.  Later in 2014, they’ll make their way across the country playing Grey Fox Bluegrass Festival in Oak Hill, NY and the IBMA Street Fair in Raleigh, NC.  After that the guys will make their way home to Austin to play the Austin City Limits Music Festival.

In February 2013, the band released their self-titled debut album to much critical acclaim. In March of this year, the guys began work on their follow up album working again with Grammy nominated producer/engineer Erick Jaskowiak in Nashville, TN.  Their second effort is a coming of age collection of original songs based on real and personal experiences with a coastal theme and is set for release in early 2015.  While Kamel is the primary songwriter and vocalist, his tunes become Wood & Wire tunes when coupled with the talents, insight, and ideas of Fisher and Smith.  The album will also feature an original written and sung by Fisher and an eclectic instrumental composed by Smith.

Touring heavily to round out the second half of 2014, the band has recently enlisted the talents of Billy Bright on the mandolin.  Billy is a veteran in the acoustic music world having toured with Peter Rowan for many years and worked with heavy hitting legends like Tony Rice and Vassar Clements.

Wood & Wire is poised to have a another breakout year; as they bring fiery bluegrass footstompers and loose, acoustic jams to packed venues across the country, it’ll be hard to say who’s having a better time: the band or the crowd

Band Members