WTCHRS
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WTCHRS

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May
11
WTCHRS @ Westgarth SC

Middlesborough, England, United Kingdom

Middlesborough, England, United Kingdom

May
10
WTCHRS @ The Cluny

Newcastle, None, United Kingdom

Newcastle, None, United Kingdom

Apr
26
WTCHRS @ Mash-Up Festival - nr Morpeth, Northumberland

Mash-UP festival - near Morpeth, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom

Mash-UP festival - near Morpeth, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom

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Music

The best kept secret in music

Press


WTCHRS – pronounced ‘watchers’ – on the other hand were captivating. An intense full-bodied sound, and aided and abetted by an enthralling frontman, they demanded attention. When, the strobe light flashing insistently, singer Liam strode open-mouthed and wide-eyed towards the audience like some sort of deranged automaton it was spellbinding. A performance unlike any other, it stood apart from anything I’ve seen before although I was never lucky enough to watch Ian Curtis.
Their performance was sensational, but what really stole the show were the mesmerising visuals: computer-generated Communist propaganda, featuring millions of uniformed party members, walking, dancing, marching, tumbling and striving. These were projected onto the performers and synchronised with the relentless rhythm. They were so amazing that I was tempted to ask the group to sit down as they were blocking my view*. I’m writing this ten days afterwards and I’m still considering moving to North Korea, pledging my allegiance to Kim Jong-un and waging unceasing war against the oppressive forces of capitalism. - http://incendiarymag.com/livereviews/wtchrs/psb_wtchrs_parastatic_studio_hartlepool_9313


WTCHRS – pronounced ‘watchers’ – on the other hand were captivating. An intense full-bodied sound, and aided and abetted by an enthralling frontman, they demanded attention. When, the strobe light flashing insistently, singer Liam strode open-mouthed and wide-eyed towards the audience like some sort of deranged automaton it was spellbinding. A performance unlike any other, it stood apart from anything I’ve seen before although I was never lucky enough to watch Ian Curtis.
Their performance was sensational, but what really stole the show were the mesmerising visuals: computer-generated Communist propaganda, featuring millions of uniformed party members, walking, dancing, marching, tumbling and striving. These were projected onto the performers and synchronised with the relentless rhythm. They were so amazing that I was tempted to ask the group to sit down as they were blocking my view*. I’m writing this ten days afterwards and I’m still considering moving to North Korea, pledging my allegiance to Kim Jong-un and waging unceasing war against the oppressive forces of capitalism. - http://incendiarymag.com/livereviews/wtchrs/psb_wtchrs_parastatic_studio_hartlepool_9313


WTCHRS eh? Apparently they lost their vowels to a pre-existing Watchers, rather than an attempt to capture a more pleasing phonetic transcription of Chas and Dave's 'Gertcha', so we'll let them off.

Theirs is an angularly portentous post-Joy Division hectoring of the sort that would have been flavour of the month 10 or 30 years ago (and which therefore probably will be again sometime around 2021). As it is, they stand or fall on whether they're any good. Which they are. The staccato bass and rhythms are topped off with a pleasingly histrionically-edged vocal and some nice sounds fired from the guitars.

Heard this sort of thing before? Yeah, maybe. Worth hearing it again from WTCHRS? Yep, certainly. - SOUNDSXP


Aha, the WTCHRS from Newcastle: I'd heard them before, enjoyed their soul sound in principle and then sort of forgot about them. However their single Round and Round is most certainly a step in the right direction, a rambling and loose song with a hint of dementia about it; the singer getting more and more frustrated with something or other, and lyrics such as "eyes like fins" only add to the feeling of disorientation. Whilst it's not a track that is immediately arresting, it's got something weird, something half-baked about it that lends itself to a repeat play. The simple warm organ backdrop gives it a nice spacious, balanced feel too; giving some sort of grounding to the histrionics.

There's also something in that bug-eyed stomp that is very reminiscent of the late, great Wooden Constructions, or a very, very drunk Franz Ferdinand, (it's that dum-dum-dum beat), but I just don’t know... At times it all can be a bit obvious but then Round and Round's not looking to be academic or clever and I enjoy that; conjuring up as it does a lurid, after-hours feeling. The sort of feeling that you get when trying to solve the world's problems whilst sitting on your arse in a backalley after 5 pints of snakebite. On second thoughts it's actually the sort of single that could be a springboard for something more powerful, and more gripping. - INDENDIARY MAGAZINE


Built around a woozy, full-bloodied bassline, ‘Round and Round’ finds WTCHRS (previously Watchers) delivering the kind of searing, high-octane rock ‘n’ roll that’s fast earning them a reputation as one of the north east’s most exciting up-and-coming bands and landing them supports with The Vaccines, The Fall and The Charlatans, amongst others, as well as catching the eye of The Futureheads’ Barry Hyde.

Here, singer Liam urgently spits out streams of venomous vituperations before braking into a manic chorus that demonstrates a genuinely impressive vocal range. But what’s most apparent is that he’s delivering it all from the heart as the band thunder and crash around him, building a dense groove before stepping up a notch to a climactic conclusion. In short, it’s a killer single. - Whisperin & Hollerin


You've probably guessed right. You pronounce their name "Watchers", and in fact that was their original name before they went all Primal Scream and ditched the vowels. We have it on good authority that this group from the North East are a formidable live experience, The Futureheads' Barry Hyde gave one such glowing testimony. If we have a look at a sample of the bands WTCHRS have supported so far it pretty much tells its own tale: The Charlatans, The Vaccines, The Fall, Islet, S.C.U.M, Peace, Clock Opera, Palma Violets... they appear to be in demand. A debut single was released in the autumn and is now followed by 'Round & Round'.

Mixing traditional indie/punk with a heavy dose of psychedelia and garage it's clear to see why sharp, intense sounds like this would be the perfect fluffer to excite the crowd before the main act. Once these guys have a few more of their own records out and themselves become top of the bill they should be a big draw too, having a harsh yet melodic sound that's something of a whirlwind and is pretty much begging to be played loud. Now that the start of year hype is beginning to settle down, we can expect the next wave of press predictions ahead of festival season. Expect WTCHRS to be somewhere near the top. - SoundOfConfusion


We're a species of watchers. From lying prone on our sofas in front of the idiot box, to rubbernecking at car wrecks on the motorway; we all long for something to stare at. We're visual creatures and we love it when something catches our eye.

The latest band that should be grabbing our attention is Tyneside's very own Watchers. Fusing the folk-tinged melodicism of Led Zeppelin's masterpiece, 'Led Zeppelin III', with manic Strokesian guitars, current single "Cut The Ribbon" is a bold creative leap forward for a band already well-known for innovation.

Formerly the hard-rocking 1892, Watchers have evolved into one of the most impressive outfits in the region. Across a fine collection of demos and self-released tracks, the four-piece have revealed a deep understanding of rock music that could rival any of the stadium-filling behemoths of the seventies.

Live, Watchers are something else entirely. In frontman Liam Milne, they have a singer who can fuse the earth-shattering bellow of Robert Plant with fresh pop undertones while the rest of the band deliver tight, vibrant prog-n-roll.

A stunning blast of chiming intellig-indie, "Cut The Ribbon" is beautifully crafted prog-pop from a band with talent to burn. Watch out for Watchers; they'll soon be cutting the ribbon on stardom, that's for sure.
- www.generator.org.uk/tippingpoint


Newcastle’s The Watchers are in support; straight out of an early ’70s West Coast acid-drowned summer festival, complete with hazy reverb, distorted vocals, and slow-burning epics that drown in a sea of droning guitar and then come up screaming for air. Yet there are songs buried deep in the bowels of these jams; the band are not just one-trick noiseniks. Watch the Watchers. - theregoesthefear.com


Newcastle’s The Watchers are in support; straight out of an early ’70s West Coast acid-drowned summer festival, complete with hazy reverb, distorted vocals, and slow-burning epics that drown in a sea of droning guitar and then come up screaming for air. Yet there are songs buried deep in the bowels of these jams; the band are not just one-trick noiseniks. Watch the Watchers. - theregoesthefear.com


My favourite act of the day, and they were on at 2:30pm (the hipsters wouldn’t have liked them anyway). A four piece from Newcastle, The Watchers played with an awe inspiring intensity, while orchestrating their wild sounds to near perfection. The lead vocalist could mutate between falsetto solos to gravely screams, the lead guitarist superbly improvised a slide guitar, and a transcendental drummer surged each track vehemently along. Baring a similarity to the genius fluctuations of Modest Mouse, The Watchers were incredibly entertaining to watch and wholly committed to each track they blasted towards the awaiting audience. Their MySpace recordings are a good indication of their music, but do not do their live performances justice. Therefore, be wise and witness these lads live! - www.crackintheroad.com


Now, I've long maintained that the real action at festivals isn't around the headliners, or even the main stages, but that the excitement lies in discovering new bands playing off to the sides, the unknown quantities who prove to be real revelations. And so it was as we stumbled into the Firkin tent, as much to escape the weather as anything else, just as Newcastle band THE WATCHERS were getting going. Why a band who've already supported The Vaccines, The Charlatans, S.C.U.M. , The Phantom Band, And You Will Know Us by The Trail of Dead are playing the fourth stage in the middle of the afternoon is as much of a mystery as the fact I'd never heard of them, but these guys blew me away. Not only did they blast out a remarkably powerful and emotive set – too rock to be post-rock but with immense sustained crescendos, too sensitive to be rock but nowhere near emo, their hybrid of psychedelia and expansive, searing, wall-of noise guitars – but it was clear that they were pouring heart and soul into their performance. For me, the band of the weekend by a very long way. - www.whisperinandhollerin.com/


The Watchers added a much needed growl to the evening – enough to unite the mismatched audience who eventually started paying attention to what they had paid to see. With a set composed almost entirely of new material, the band have honed their craft and now most songs clock in at around three minutes. Thankfully, this hasn’t diluted what made them special.

There’s more focus on singer Liam Milne’s voice which hit an impressive falsetto in Wreck In Recovery. Their guitarist isn’t let loose to the full Jimmy Page maximum as he much as he might want to be, but the new material displays tight song writing while still treading the same psychedelic vibe which means they remain one of Newcastle’s most impressive live acts. - Kyeo.TV


Preceding the headliners were local support- up, and coming act, Watchers, whose intense psychedelic mathpop and indie rock blend soon earned the undivided attention of those watching back, confirmed by the silence which they fell into after raucous rounds of applause. With song structures echoing those of recently acclaimed Dutch Uncles and the like, but with an undeniably stronger frontman, (who remained undefeated by a very rock and roll mid-set nosebleed) Watchers will certainly be memorable to those who attended. - middleboopmag.com


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio


Newcastle based WTCHRS officially formed in 2010. Known then as 'watchers' (it is still pronounced that way), they quickly put themselves on the map in the north east of England as one of the ‘must see’ live bands with their vigorous and intense brand of psychedelic rock.

Since then they have supported many bands including The Vaccines, The Charlatans, The Fall, Palma Violets, Peace, Islet, Clock Opera and in March 2013 they toured supporting Public Service Broadcasting on six dates. More recently they have supported Drenge and Temples.

Currently, the band are preparing for their next release (date TBC).