W.T.  Feaster Band
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W.T. Feaster Band

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CD Review from Blues Matters!, Blueswax, and Elmore Magazine


Long Overdue Indeed,

The Indianapolis power trio of Travis Feaster (guitar and vocals), Austin Shearer (bass), and Jake Iseminger (drums) are joined by J. Wesley Smith on piano and organ for the band's superb debut album, Long Overdue.
After years in residency at the famous Slippery Noodle Inn playing covers of Hendrix, SRV, and all of the Kings, the W.T. Feaster Band has come up with ten great original songs confirming the transition to accomplished musicians in their own right. Celebrity endorsement has already come from Tad Robinson, one of the top singers of Soul Blues, who opines, "Nice sounds, good songs, and great playing."

The CD is a mix of Blues, Rock, Soul, and groovy Funk, with Feaster proving that he can write poignant lyrics as well as play one of the fastest guitars in the midwest. Smith's keyboard playing is melodic improvisation at its best while Iseminger lays down infectious rhythms, adding subtle nuances and clever changes in pace and dynamics. Add the constant, solid rolling bass of Shearer and the outcome is the perfect platform for the bandleader's mellifluous voice and his mind-bending, diamond-hard riffs as Feaster mercilessly attacks his Fender Stratocaster which screams with an edgy intensity on some tracks and is played with gentle intricacy on others.

Tracks that stand out are the pure Blues of "Walk On," the soulful "Out Of Time," and the slow, haunting "Devil's Daughter," the latter sounding atmospheric courtesy of Smith's captivating organ playing. Appropriately, the CD climaxes with the instrumental "Big Ed," showcasing the talents of the remarkable Travis Feaster whose scorching and piercing solos are played effortlessly and with nimble dexterity. This young band is now ready to blast headfirst into the future and lead a new generation of Blues fans down to the Crossroads, something that is long overdue. Watch out for Feaster's first visit to the U.K. in 2008 as the band sounds even better live than in the studio.

- Blues Matters!, Blueswax, and Elmore Magazine


WT FEASTER BAND AT THE SLIPPERY NOODLE INN,
INDIANAPOLIS,
December 4-8 2006 by Dave Scott, Journalist, Blues Matters!
KBA Winners 2007


At the legendary, mid-west blues venue I witnessed a performance of boundless energy, telepathic musicianship and a flourish of six string ferocity I had not seen since Eric Clapton and Cream at my native Nottingham University in 1967. I found it unbelievable that a relatively unknown resident band, W T Feaster, could produce such awesome, fiery blues to a packed house of jaw dropping fans and visiting blues aficianados most nights of the week. Unbelievable, that was, until I visited this Mecca of the blues on five successive evenings, the last one coinciding with the finals of Indiana's Best Local Blues Band contest. First on stage were the previous year's victors, Travis Feaster's electrifying and eclectic three-piece who went on to represent the State at the International Blues Challenge Final in Memphis. Whilst the group can play several genres of music including soul, R&B and grooving funk, the set I most enjoyed was the contest selection of original material and Texas and Chicago blues. W. T. Boogie, the haunting Devil's Daughter and a funky I Got The Blues are examples of the former which confirm Feaster's emerging talents as a very competent composer/lyricist which will be the key to the band's future success. However, the blues covers belie this description as they are innovative, high-energy interpretations of classics such as Born Under A Bad Sign, Lookin' Back and Big Legged Woman. W T Feaster personalises these numbers with his mind bending, diamond hard riffs as he mercilessly attacks his Fender Stratocaster which screams with an edgy intensity. However, the scorching, piercing solos are only one aspect of Feaster's style. Fulsom's Five Long Years and Traffic's Dear Mr Fantasy show a sensitive side which highlight the singer's mellifluous voice and intricate, eloquent finger picking. It has famously been said of Jeff Beck, "It is all in the fingers" and this is true of Feaster who plays nimbly and effortlessly whilst creating a sound as heavy and raucous as Alvin Lee and as distinctive as Stevie Ray and Jimi Hendrix. However, Feaster belies all such early influences and is very much his own man who at the tender age of 27 is already blasting headfirst into the future and leading a new generation of blues fans down to the Crossroads. Lets remember though, above all this is a team effort and Jake Iseminger on drums and bassist Austin Shearer lay down the grooves and the infectious rhythms which make for such a tight and unique sound. If the W T Feaster band does not break through onto the national and international scene in 2007 then I will be the first reveller naked in the fountain at London's Trafalgar Square on December 31st. In the meantime, get down to the Slippery Noodle while you can see them play for 5 dollars but prepare to be scorched.



- Blues Matters!


Interview with Matt Scocey of Nuvo Magazine
Current mood: blessed


The W.T. Feaster Band has been an Indianapolis club staple for two and a half years, but they've only recently released their debut record, appropriately called Long Overdue. For such a popular blues/rock band, why the delay? It's all in the timing, says singer/guitarist Travis Feaster, who waited for that perfect moment along with his bandmates, drummer Jake Iseminger, bassist Austin Shearer and J. Wesley Smith on the ivories.

"I just wanted to make sure it was an album that was decent. Something I'll be proud of. When I hand the album out, I make no excuses. I've seen bands over the years hand out CDs and say things like, 'The sound is OK.' 'This is what we have so far.' I didn't want do to that. I feel confident that this album [is] what we are right now. Two years from now, who knows?" Feaster says.

The band is one of several Indianapolis bands building a bridge between rock and blues: You can hear rock staples like "Hey Joe" and "Use Me" on the band's MySpace page.

"That's what I want to go for. I want to be a blues influenced artist if I have to have a title … I don't claim to be a blues player, but to fully understand something, you have to know where it comes from. I want to borrow from it without claiming to be it," Feaster says.

Feaster listens to music of all kinds, including songs that were penned long before he was born. One of his biggest influences as a musician and showman is blues harmonica giant Junior Wells. "A lot of people are surprised of that because I'm not a harmonica player," Feaster explains. "I've always been fascinated by him. There's a song on the Best of the Vanguard Years called 'Stomach Ache.' It's just him chanting and then him saying, 'I got the stomach ache,' and I thought, 'Who is this guy?' He could be a funky, soulful player and not just a blues guy. A lot of people knew him through his affiliation with Buddy Guy. I hate to admit this, but I found out about Buddy because of Junior."

This is the W.T. Feaster Band's first New Year's Eve appearance at the Slippery Noodle. Performing on the other stage will be Indy's own Biscuit & The Mix, of which Feaster is a fan.

"Biscuit's a great guy and they're a great band. We want to make it a night to remember. You're not going to hear the two bands play the same song, especially in one night," Feaster says.
- Nuvo Magazine


W.T. Feaster stood on the stage at the intersection of Seventh Street and Wabash Avenue wearing a black hat and a black shirt with an orange and yellow flame-like pattern on the front. If you caught him out of the corner of your eye, you might have thought his guitar was on fire. Figuratively, it was.

The Indianapolis-based W.T. Feaster Band kicked off the "Blues at the Crossroads Festival" with a rocking set that included originals as well as some well-known blues favorites.

The 25-year-old Feaster, a graduate of Vincennes University, started playing the guitar at age 17 after being raised on blues, Motown and soul music. His self-taught style has led to a familiarity with the fretboard that brought the Bluesfest crowd to its feet a number of times on covers such as B.B. King's "The Thrill is Gone," Jimi Hendrix's "Redhouse" (by request) and Stevie Ray Vaughn's "Cold Shot."

Feaster wowed the audience by playing behind his back and head, as well as plucking strings with his teeth.

Not only can Feaster wail on the guitar, but he can also sing with the authority and timbre of a Pentecostal preacher. These factors, combined with the competency of his two bandmates, bassist Dave Williams and drummer Toney Branca, make the W.T. Feaster Band a trio capable of delivering a raw boatload of blues energy reminiscent of the legendary "Jimi Hendrix Experience."
- Indiana Statesman


Discography

Long Overdue - 2007

As of February of 2008, "Long Overdue" was in the top 40 albums on CD Baby.com

Photos

Bio

From Nuvo Magazine -

The W.T. Feaster Band has been an Indianapolis club staple for two and a half years, but they've only recently released their debut record, appropriately called Long Overdue. For such a popular blues/rock band, why the delay? It's all in the timing, says singer/guitarist Travis Feaster, who waited for that perfect moment along with his bandmates, drummer Jake Iseminger, bassist Austin Shearer and J. Wesley Smith on the ivories.

"I just wanted to make sure it was an album that was decent. Something I'll be proud of. When I hand the album out, I make no excuses. I've seen bands over the years hand out CDs and say things like, 'The sound is OK.' 'This is what we have so far.' I didn't want do to that. I feel confident that this album [is] what we are right now. Two years from now, who knows?" Feaster says.

The band is one of several Indianapolis bands building a bridge between rock and blues: You can hear rock staples like "Hey Joe" and "Use Me" on the band's MySpace page.

"That's what I want to go for. I want to be a blues influenced artist if I have to have a title … I don't claim to be a blues player, but to fully understand something, you have to know where it comes from. I want to borrow from it without claiming to be it," Feaster says.

Feaster listens to music of all kinds, including songs that were penned long before he was born. One of his biggest influences as a musician and showman is blues harmonica giant Junior Wells. "A lot of people are surprised of that because I'm not a harmonica player," Feaster explains. "I've always been fascinated by him. There's a song on the Best of the Vanguard Years called 'Stomach Ache.' It's just him chanting and then him saying, 'I got the stomach ache,' and I thought, 'Who is this guy?' He could be a funky, soulful player and not just a blues guy. A lot of people knew him through his affiliation with Buddy Guy. I hate to admit this, but I found out about Buddy because of Junior."

This is the W.T. Feaster Band's first New Year's Eve appearance at the Slippery Noodle.